Students weigh in on school dress code

Bailee+Howard+illustrates+the+concerns+of+the+dress+code+rule+about+showing+shoulders+to+Emma+Evans+and+Collin+Sherrill.
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Students weigh in on school dress code

Bailee Howard illustrates the concerns of the dress code rule about showing shoulders to Emma Evans and Collin Sherrill.

Bailee Howard illustrates the concerns of the dress code rule about showing shoulders to Emma Evans and Collin Sherrill.

Rylee Brown

Bailee Howard illustrates the concerns of the dress code rule about showing shoulders to Emma Evans and Collin Sherrill.

Rylee Brown

Rylee Brown

Bailee Howard illustrates the concerns of the dress code rule about showing shoulders to Emma Evans and Collin Sherrill.

Rylee brown, Teachers Reporters

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One day at Duncan Middle School, I witnessed a couple of girls getting dress coded for some very unnecessary reasons.

Rylee Brown

I noticed those girls getting dress coded for things that people wear to school on a regular basis. The first thing that got dress coded was a girl’s shoulders; she was wearing an off the shoulder shirt.

I thought that this was very unnecessary because I will see sixth-grade girls walking down the halls wearing crop tops, really short shorts or even spandex. 

Because of what I think of our dress code at DMS, last week I went and interviewed 108 boys to get their opinions because they are supposedly the ones that get affected by what girls wear.

I started off with sixth grade, and I asked them “ Do you think girls should be able to show their shoulders at school?”

I only got to ask 20 boys, and all of them said “Yes” and that they don’t have a problem with it because it’s not distracting what so ever.

After I talked to the sixth-graders, I went down to the seventh-grade hall and asked 33 of the boys if they thought that the dress code was sexist, and everyone of them said “Yes.”

However, we then asked 12 more boys, and they said no, but that was expected because that’s a very opinionated question.

Lastly after talking to seventh grade, I went to interview some eighth-graders. I interviewed more than I thought I would. I interviewed 43 boys, and I asked them, “Do you think it’s right that girls have to take time out of their learning education just so the boys won’t get distracted?’’

Thirty-six out of the 43 boys said that they don’t think it is right. The rest of the boys said that they think it’s right because it’s the school-enforced rules.